Thursday, July 13, 2017

New Staff at Keystone Elementary #keyrocks

Miss Katie Dirksen - Kindergarten teacher.  Miss Dirksen is replacing Mrs. Jodie Kimm.  Miss Dirksen is currently co-teaching the K-1 Summer School group and is going to be a fantastic addition to our building.  She has been in often getting her room ready and is very excited to be a part of Keystone Elementary and Benton CSD.  Please welcome her when you see her.

Miss Shelby Frana - Pre-School teacher.  Miss Frana is replacing Mrs. Benton.  Miss Frana will be teaching our 3-4 year old Pre-school groups with Mrs. Mehlert as her associate.  Miss Frana is going to be a great addition to Keystone Elementary and Benton CSD.  She is very excited to get started!!  Please welcome her to the community and district when you meet her.

Mrs. Sandy Maxwell - Special Education Associate.  Mrs. Maxwell will be joining us in August when school starts.  Mrs. Maxwell will be helping with all K-3 students.  We are very fortunate to have Mrs. Maxwell joining our building and district.

Ms. Amber St. John - Technology / ELL / Reading Intervention.  Mrs. St. John will be taking on multiple roles within our building and district.  At Keystone Ms. St. John will be teaching Technology and ELL.  Ms. St John will also be doing some Reading Intervention work at Keystone.  She will be teaching Technology at Atkins, ELL at Norway, and doing some Reading Intervention work at Atkins.  She will bring a lot of great skills and passion to our buildings and district.  Please welcome her when you see her.  


Enjoy the rest of your summer!!

Mr. Junge

  


Thursday, July 6, 2017

Importance of Summer Reading

Children who don't read over the summer experience summer learning loss. That's right -- kids don't just feel like they've forgotten some of what they've learned -- they actually do forget it. And the effect is cumulative. Kids who lose reading skills over the summer will be two years behind their classmates by the end of 6th grade.

Summer Reading Statistics

  • Low-income children, by the end of fifth grade, are about 2.5 years behind their more affluent peers. This is primarily due to summer learning loss.
  • Students experience significant learning loss when they do not participate in educational activities during the summer months. Research shows that students on average score lower on standardized tests at the end of summer than they do on the same tests at the end of the school year. Low-income students experience greater summer learning losses than their higher income peers. On average, middle-income students experience slight gains in reading performance during summer vacation. Low-income students experience about a two month loss in reading achievement.
  • The achievement gap in reading scores between higher and lower income students increases over summer vacation. The research shows that achievement for both middle-and lower-income students improves at a similar rate during the school year.
  • Reading just 4-5 books during the summer can prevent a decline in a child's fall reading scores.
  • Summer reading loss is cumulative, these children do not typically catch up in the fall. Their peers are progressing with their skills while they are making up for the summer learning loss. By the end of 6th grade, children who lose reading skills during the summer are on average 2 years behind their peers.
  • Teachers spend an average of 4-6 weeks re-teaching material that students have lost during the summer.

Summer Reading Statistics Low-income children, by the end of fifth grade, are about 2.5 years behind their more affluent peers. This is primarily due to summer learning loss. Students experience significant learning loss when they do not participate in educational activities during the summer months. Research shows that students on average score lower on standardized tests at the end of summer than they do on the same tests at the end of the school year. Low-income students experience greater summer learning losses than their higher income peers. On average, middle-income students experience slight gains in reading performance during summer vacation. Low-income students experience about a two month loss in reading achievement. The achievement gap in reading scores between higher and lower income students increases over summer vacation. The research shows that achievement for both middle-and lower-income students improves at a similar rate during the school year. Reading just 4-5 books during the summer can prevent a decline in a child's fall reading scores. Summer reading loss is cumulative, these children do not typically catch up in the fall. Their peers are progressing with their skills while they are making up for the summer learning loss. By the end of 6th grade, children who lose reading skills during the summer are on average 2 years behind their peers. Teachers spend an average of 4-6 weeks re-teaching material that students have lost during the summer.